ALABAMA SEED TO SALE TRACEABILITY
KNOWLEDGE CENTER

Created to provide helpful information about the Alabama Cannabis Industry.

CANNABIS LICENSE INFO

Updated: April 2022

Effective May 17, 2021, Alabama legalized the use of marijuana for medical purposes under the Darren Wesley “Ato” Hall Compassion Act. Recreational marijuana, also commonly referred to as “adult use” cannabis to distinguish it from medical marijuana, is not legal in Alabama.

The Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission (AMCC) is responsible for licensing dispensaries, processors, transporters, and labs, as well as administering and enforcing the laws related to medical cannabis. The Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (“department”) is responsible for regulating the cultivation of cannabis and licensing cultivators.

The first round of license applications are set to be released on September 1, 2022. As long as this date is upheld for cultivator licenses, cannabis products will not be available until 2023 since it takes at least three months to grow marijuana plants in a greenhouse.

Below you will find information regarding licensing procedures for dispensaries, cultivators, and processors. We keep this page up-to-date when new information becomes available. Please note that this page is for informational purposes only and should not be considered legal advice.

Alabama Cannabis Dispensary Licenses

 

Definition

Dispensaries sell cannabis and cannabis products in a legal, regulated setting. The Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission (AMCC) plans to issue no more than four dispensary licenses.

Dispensaries must be located at least 1,000 feet away from any school or child care facility. A license holder can operate up to three dispensaries, provided that each site is located in a different county.

 

Requirements

Applicants must have records indicating that the majority shareholders have resided in Alabama for at least 15 consecutive years prior to the application date. Applicants must also certify that they do not have an economic interest in any other cannabis licenses.

Each person with an economic interest in an applicant (e.g. owners, shareholders, directors, board members) must undergo a state and national criminal background check. An application will be automatically denied if someone with a controlling interest in the applicant has been:

  • Convicted of or released from incarceration for a felony within the last 10 years.
  • Convicted of a controlled substance-related felony within the last 10 years.

 

Process

The AMCC will first conduct a background check of those with an economic interest in the applicant, as well as employees, contractors, and others with access to cannabis, the facility, and any related equipment and supplies. Each individual must submit their fingerprints to the Alabama State Law Enforcement Agency for a state criminal history check and to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for a federal criminal history check.

Next, applicants must complete and submit their applications. There is a nonrefundable application fee of $2,500.

If the AMCC receives an incomplete application, it will notify the applicant of any deficiencies and provide instructions for submitting a corrected application. The applicant will have no more than 60 days to revise and resubmit their application.

Before issuing a license, the AMCC will hold a 30 day period for members of the public to submit written comments regarding the applicant. The AMCC may hold a public hearing, as it deems necessary, where the applicant may present their business plan and field questions from the public.

The AMCC will also conduct an on-site inspection at each of the applicant’s facilities prior to issuing a license. The AMCC will either grant or deny a license within 60 days of receiving an application. If the applicant was notified of a deficiency, the AMCC will grant or deny a license within 60 days of receiving the corrected application.

If their application is denied, an applicant may request that the AMCC hold a public investigative hearing, where they have the opportunity to submit evidence and give testimony to prove their suitability for a license. However, the AMCC’s decision is not limited to the testimony and evidence presented at the hearing.

If their application is approved, an applicant must pay the annual license fee before they receive their license. A dispensary license must be renewed annually; if a renewal application isn’t submitted by the license expiration date, the dispensary has 60 days to renew by submitting their application, paying the annual fee, and satisfying any other requirements or late fees. The license holder may continue to operate during these 60 days after their license expires.

 

What kind of point-of-sale do I need to operate a Dispensary?

 

Most states require dispensaries to track and trace all of their cannabis-related products for regulatory and compliance reporting requirements. Our Dispensary Point of Sale and inventory management system provides comprehensive seed-to-sale cannabis tracking with a focus on compliant data points.  If your state requires seed-to-sale systems to stay compliant, BioTrackTHC has you covered.  Our system is customized to meet the unique regulatory frameworks in each and every state.

Alabama Cannabis Cultivation Licenses

 

Definition

Cultivators, also commonly referred to as growers or producers, are responsible for growing cannabis. Once harvested, mature plants are transferred to processors. The Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission (AMCC) and the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (“department”) plan to issue no more than 12 cultivator licenses.

 

Requirements

Applicants must certify that they do not have an economic interest in any other cannabis licenses. They also must:

  1. Provide proof that the majority shareholders have resided in Alabama for at least 15 consecutive years prior to the application date.
  2. Provide proof that the majority shareholders have at least 15 years of cumulative business experience in commercial horticulture or agronomic production.
  3. Be able to begin cultivating cannabis within 60 days of application approval.

Each person with an economic interest in an applicant (e.g. owners, shareholders, directors, board members) must undergo a state and national criminal background check. An application will be automatically denied if someone with a controlling interest in the applicant has been:

  1. Convicted of or released from incarceration for a felony within the last 10 years.
  2. Convicted of a controlled substance-related felony within the last 10 years.

Additionally, all employees must not have any conviction within the past 10 years for a controlled substance-related misdemeanor or felony.

 

Process

The department will first conduct a background check of those with an economic interest in the applicant, as well as employees, contractors, and others with access to cannabis, the facility, and any related equipment and supplies. Each individual must submit their fingerprints to the Alabama State Law Enforcement Agency for a state criminal history check and to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for a federal criminal history check.

Next, applicants must complete and submit their applications. There is a nonrefundable application fee of $2,500.

If the department receives an incomplete application, it will notify the applicant of any deficiencies and provide instructions for submitting a corrected application. The applicant will have no more than 60 days to revise and resubmit their application.

Before issuing a license, the department will hold a 30 day period for members of the public to submit written comments regarding the applicant. The department may hold a public hearing, as it deems necessary, where the applicant may present their business plan and field questions from the public.

The department will also conduct an on-site inspection at each of the applicant’s facilities prior to issuing a license. The department will either grant or deny a license within 60 days of receiving an application. If the applicant was notified of a deficiency, the department will grant or deny a license within 60 days of receiving the corrected application.

If their application is denied, an applicant may request that the department hold a public investigative hearing, where they have the opportunity to submit evidence and give testimony to prove their suitability for a license. However, the department’s decision is not limited to the testimony and evidence presented at the hearing.

If their application is approved, an applicant must pay the annual license fee before they receive their license. A cultivator license must be renewed annually; if a renewal application isn’t submitted by the license expiration date, the cultivator has 60 days to renew by submitting their application, paying the annual fee, and satisfying any other requirements or late fees. The license holder may continue to operate during these 60 days after their license expires.

 

What kind of tracking system do I need to operate a Cultivation Facility?

 

Most states require an extensive seed-to-sale cannabis tracking system to monitor cultivation efforts and inventory.  Our cultivation seed-to-sale-tracking solution provides comprehensive data tracking with an emphasis on compliance.  Customized to meet the unique regulatory frameworks in each state, BioTrackTHC also features an all-in-one business tool to help you operate every aspect of the cultivation business by itself, or as part of the vertically-integrated cannabis business.

Product Manufactures take harvested cannabis from Cultivators and create derivative extracts for edibles, concentrates, topicals, and prepacks. Finished products are transported to Retail Marijuana Stores.

Alabama Cannabis Processor Licenses

 

Definition

Processors—also known as manufacturers—take harvested cannabis from cultivators and create derivative extracts for edibles, concentrates, topicals, and prepacks. Once finished, their products are transported to dispensaries. The Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission (AMCC) plans to issue no more than four processor licenses.

Cannabis products cannot be processed into a form that is attractive to or targets children. The AMCC will establish one universal flavor for all gelatinous cube, cuboid, and lozenge products.

 

Requirements

Applicants must have records indicating that the majority shareholders have resided in Alabama for at least 15 consecutive years prior to the application date. Applicants must also certify that they do not have an economic interest in any other cannabis licenses.

Each person with an economic interest in an applicant (e.g. owners, shareholders, directors, board members) must undergo a state and national criminal background check. An application will be automatically denied if someone with a controlling interest in the applicant has been:

  1. Convicted of or released from incarceration for a felony within the last 10 years.
  2. Convicted of a controlled substance-related felony within the last 10 years.

 

Process

The AMCC will first conduct a background check of those with an economic interest in the applicant, as well as employees, contractors, and others with access to cannabis, the facility, and any related equipment and supplies. Each individual must submit their fingerprints to the Alabama State Law Enforcement Agency for a state criminal history check and to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for a federal criminal history check.

Next, applicants must complete and submit their applications. There is a nonrefundable application fee of $2,500.

If the AMCC receives an incomplete application, it will notify the applicant of any deficiencies and provide instructions for submitting a corrected application. The applicant will have no more than 60 days to revise and resubmit their application.

Before issuing a license, the AMCC will hold a 30 day period for members of the public to submit written comments regarding the applicant. The AMCC may hold a public hearing, as it deems necessary, where the applicant may present their business plan and field questions from the public.

The AMCC will also conduct an on-site inspection at each of the applicant’s facilities prior to issuing a license. The AMCC will either grant or deny a license within 60 days of receiving an application. If the applicant was notified of a deficiency, the AMCC will grant or deny a license within 60 days of receiving the corrected application.

If their application is denied, an applicant may request that the AMCC hold a public investigative hearing, where they have the opportunity to submit evidence and give testimony to prove their suitability for a license. However, the AMCC’s decision is not limited to the testimony and evidence presented at the hearing.

If their application is approved, an applicant must pay the annual license fee before they receive their license. A processor license must be renewed annually; if a renewal application isn’t submitted by the license expiration date, the processor has 60 days to renew by submitting their application, paying the annual fee, and satisfying any other requirements or late fees. The license holder may continue to operate during these 60 days after their license expires.

 

What kind of tracking system do I need to operate a Processing or Manufacturing Facility?

 

Most states require an extensive seed-to-sale cannabis tracking system to monitor processing and manufacturing efforts, which is especially important in this part of the supply chain due to conversions into multiple byproducts and higher amounts of waste.  Our processing seed-to-sale-tracking solution provides comprehensive conversion tracking focused on compliant data points.  Customized to meet the unique regulatory frameworks in each state, BioTrackTHC also features an all-in-one business tool to help you operate every aspect of the cultivation business by itself, or as part of the vertically-integrated cannabis business.

Integrated Facility License

An integrated facility license authorizes a license holder to act as a medical cannabis cultivator, processor, secure transporter, and dispensary. The Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission (AMCC) and the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (“department”) plan to issue no more than five integrated facility licenses. A license holder can operate up to five dispensaries, provided that each site is located in a different county.

An integrated facility license holder is subject to the same rules and regulation as cultivators, processors, secure transporters, and dispensaries. On top of the general application requirements, an integrated facility license applicant must provide:

  1. Acknowledgement of their ability to secure a $2 million performance bond issued by an approved surety insurance company.
  2. Proof of at least $250,000 in liquid assets.
  3. Proof that they are financially able to maintain operations for at least two years following the date of application.
  4. Proof that the majority shareholders have at least 15 years of cumulative business experience in commercial horticulture or agronomic production.

Applicants must also be able to begin cultivating cannabis within 60 days of application approval.

 

Secure Transporter License

A secure transporter license authorizes the license holder to store and transport cannabis on behalf of other cannabis businesses; a secure transporter cannot transfer products directly to registered patients or designated caregivers.

Individuals who transport cannabis cannot have been:

  1. Convicted of or released from incarceration for a felony within the last five years.
  2. Convicted of a misdemeanor involving a controlled substance within the last five years.

 

State Testing Laboratory License

A state testing laboratory license authorizes the license holder to possess and test cannabis and cannabis products cultivated or processed at licensed facilities. State testing laboratories can take cannabis from, test cannabis for, and return cannabis to a licensed facility without a secure transporter. They can also collect random samples for testing at the site of a cultivator, processor, or dispensary without a secure transporter.

A state testing laboratory applicant must:

  1. Not have an interest in any other cannabis businesses.
  2. Be accredited and meet the requirements for a testing laboratory in international standard ISO/IEC 17025, demonstrating testing capabilities in cannabinoids, pesticides, toxins, metals, and microbiological bacteria.
  3. Have at least one employee with an advanced degree in medical or laboratory science.

What kind of software do I need to operate these other business types?

Most states require dispensaries to track and trace all of their cannabis-related products for regulatory and compliance reporting requirements. Our cannabis POS and inventory management system provides comprehensive seed-to-sale cannabis tracking with a focus on compliant data points.  If your state requires seed-to-sale systems to stay compliant, BioTrack has you covered.  Our system is customized to meet the unique regulatory frameworks in each and every state.

Q&A – CANNABIS LAWS

 

Who can purchase cannabis in Alabama? 

Once dispensaries open, Alabama patients aged 19 years and older, and minors with a designated caregiver who is at least 21 years old, will be able to purchase cannabis from licensed dispensaries with their medical cannabis cards.

 

Are there qualifying conditions for medical cannabis patients? 

Yes. Patients must be diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition to use medical cannabis in Alabama. You can find a list of qualifying conditions on the Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission’s FAQ page.

 

Q&A – RETAIL CANNABIS LICENSING

 

What state agency is in charge of retail cannabis licensing in Alabama?

The Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission is in charge of retail cannabis licensing.

 

What are the application fees and costs for a cannabis retailer license?

For dispensary applicants, there is a nonrefundable application fee of $2,500, plus an annual license fee that will be between $10,000 and $50,000. Applicants must also have $2 million of liability and casualty insurance.

For integrated facility applicants, there is a nonrefundable application fee of $2,500, plus an annual license fee that will be between $10,000 and $50,000. Applicants must also secure a $2 million performance bond and have proof of at least $250,000 in liquid assets. Based on our market projections, this could be a $10-$20 million project.

All medical marijuana sales will be subject to a 9% gross proceeds tax.

 

Q&A – CANNABIS TRACKING AND REPORTING

 

What is the official state cannabis verification system in Alabama?

Alabama does not currently have an official cannabis verification and monitoring system.

 

What are the tracking and reporting requirements for cannabis retailers in Alabama?

Licensed cannabis retailers must record the date, time, amount, type, and price of each sale or transfer of medical cannabis to a registered patient or designated caregiver. Additionally, they must track and report:

  1. Refunds.
  2. Lot and batch information.
  3. Products, conversions, and derivatives.
  4. Plant, batch, and product destruction.
  5. Batch recalls.
  6. Loss, theft, or diversion of products.
  7. Inventory discrepancies.

 

What are the inventory control system requirements for cannabis retailers in Alabama? 

Licensed cannabis retailers must use a third-party inventory control and tracking system that links with the state’s seed-to-sale system. This third-party system must be accessible to the Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission (AMCC) and other state agencies, as well as provide the AMCC with key performance indicators like total daily sales, total cannabis plants in production, total cannabis plants destroyed, and total inventory adjustments.

 

Is BioTrack compliant with Alabama’s cannabis tracking, reporting, and inventory control requirements?

Yes. Our extensive seed-to-sale software allows licensed operators to remain compliant while identifying key data points to streamline and optimize inventory management at each phase of the operation. Some of our features include:

  • Automatic reporting to the state system.
  • Custom compliance-focused reporting.
  • Waste and destruction tracking.
  • Unique alphanumeric tags.
  • Transport manifests.
  • Real-time product recall information.
  • Compliant labels customized to your business.
  • Industry-leading security standards.
  • 24/7 access to real-time data, analytics, and reports.
  • Integration metrics.

AL SB236

Medical Marijuana, Medical Cannabis Study Commission, established, membership and duties provided, defense against prosecution for marijuana possession established, Secs. 13A-12-214.2, 13A-12-214.3 am’d

Section 1. (a) There is established the Medical Cannabis Study Commission comprised of the following members:

   (1) Three members appointed by the Governor, one of whom is a physician licensed to practice medicine in this state with a practice that involves pain management or certified in the specialty of neurology; and one of whom is a licensed pharmacist.

   (2) Two members appointed by the Lieutenant Governor, one of whom is a physician licensed to practice medicine in this state with a practice that involves palliative care; and one of whom is a physician licensed to practice medicine in this state certified in the specialty of pediatric neurology.

   (4) Two members appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, one of whom has a background and experience in mental health or substance abuse counselling and treatment; and one of whom has professional experience in agricultural systems management.

   (7) The Director of the Department of Forensic Sciences or his or her designee.

   (8) One member appointed by the Executive Director of the Drug Education Council.

      (b) Members must be at least 30 years of age, citizens of the United States, and residents of this state for at least five continuous years immediately preceding their appointment. The appointing officers shall coordinate their appointments so that diversity of gender, race, and geographical areas is reflective of the makeup of this state.

      (c) A member may not have any interest, financial or otherwise, direct or indirect, in any dispensary, cultivator, processor, or distributor of hemp or marijuana in any state.

      (d) The first meeting of the commission shall be called by the President Pro Tempore of the Senate not later than July 15, 2019, and the commission shall meet as soon as practical at a time and place set by the President Pro Tempore. At the first meeting, the commission shall elect a chair and vice-chair. Members may participate by telephone, video conference, or by similar communications equipment so that all individuals participating in the meeting may hear each other at the same time. Participating by such means shall constitute presence in person at a meeting for all purposes. Notice of meetings shall be provided in accordance with the Alabama Open Meetings Act, and telephone or video conference or similar communications equipment shall also allow all members of the public the opportunity to simultaneously listen to or observe such meetings.

         (1) Schedule and hold a minimum of three public hearings to hear from patients and families who may benefit from the use of medical cannabis, from physicians and other health care providers who may be involved in the implementation of medical cannabis use in the state, and from members of the public who have interests or concerns regarding medical cannabis.

         (2) Examine federal laws and regulations and other states’ laws and legislation, as well as legislation in this state, relating to the medical use of cannabis. The commission shall specifically consider issues relating to patient qualification; the role of physicians in recommending the medical use of cannabis; patient registration; licensing of facilities and providers of medical cannabis services such as cultivation, processing, labelling, transporting, shipping, and dispensing of medical cannabis; testing of medical cannabis to ensure product safety; the role of law enforcement; the role of other state regulatory agencies or boards; current criminal laws relating to possession and use of marijuana; and any other issues relevant to the medical use of cannabis.

         (3) Make recommendations to the Legislature relating to the medical use of cannabis in the state.

      (g) The commission shall report its findings and draft legislation to the Speaker of the House and the President Pro Tempore by December 1, 2019.

      (h) The commission shall be dissolved on the last day of the 2020 Regular Session, unless extended by act of the Legislature.

      (i) Upon the request of the chair, the Secretary of the Senate, the Clerk of the House of Representatives, and the Legislative Services Agency shall provide necessary clerical assistance for the work of the commission.

Section 2. Section 13A-12-214.2, Code of Alabama 1975, is amended to read as follows:

Ҥ13A-12-214.2.

   “(a) This section shall be known and may be cited as “Carly’s Law.”

   “(b) As used in this section, the following words shall have the following meanings:

      “(1) AUTHORIZED BY THE UAB DEPARTMENT. Authorized by the UAB Department means that Cannabidiol (CBD) has been prescribed by a health care practitioner employed by or on behalf of the UAB Department.

      “(2) CANNABIDIOL (CBD). [13956-29-1]. A (nonpsychoactive) cannabinoid found in the plant Cannabis sativa L. or any other preparation thereof that is essentially free from plant material, and has a THC level of no more than 3 percent. Also known as (synonyms): 2-[(1R,6R)-3-Methyl-6-(1-methylethenyl)-2-cyclohexen-1-yl]-5-p entyl-1,3-benzenediol; trans-(-)-2-p-mentha-1,8-dien-3-yl-5-pentylresorcinol; (-)-Cannabidiol; (-)-trans-Cannabidiol; Cannabidiol (7CI); D1(2)-trans-Cannabidiol.

      “(3) DEBILITATING EPILEPTIC CONDITION. Epilepsy or other neurological disorder, or the treatment of epilepsy or other neurological disorder that, as diagnosed by a board-certified neurologist under the employment or authority of the UAB Department, produces serious, debilitating, or life-threatening seizures.

      “(4) UAB DEPARTMENT. The Department of Neurology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, its successors, or any subdivisions.

   “(c) In a prosecution for the unlawful possession of marijuana under the laws of this state, it is an affirmative and complete defense to the prosecution that the defendant has a debilitating epileptic condition and used or possessed cannabidiol (CBD) pursuant to a prescription authorized by the UAB Department.

   “(d) In a prosecution for the unlawful possession of marijuana under the laws of this state, it is an affirmative and complete defense to the prosecution that the defendant possessed cannabidiol (CBD) because he or she is the parent or caretaker of an individual who has a debilitating epileptic condition and who has a prescription for the possession and use of cannabidiol (CBD) as authorized by the UAB Department, and where the parent or caretaker’s possession of the CBD is on behalf of and otherwise for the prescribed person’s use only.

   “(e) An agency of this state or a political subdivision thereof, including any law enforcement agency, may not initiate proceedings to remove a child from the home of a parent based solely upon the parent’s or child’s possession or use of cannabidiol (CBD) as authorized by this section.

   “(f) A prescription for the possession or use of cannabidiol (CBD) as authorized by this section shall be provided exclusively by the UAB Department for a debilitating epileptic condition. Health care practitioners of the UAB Department shall be the sole authorized source of any prescription for the use of cannabidiol (CBD), and shall be the sole authorized source to use cannabidiol (CBD) in or as a part of the treatment of a person diagnosed with a debilitating epileptic condition. A health care practitioner of the UAB Department shall have the sole authority to determine the use or amount of cannabidiol (CBD), if any, in the treatment of an individual diagnosed with a debilitating epileptic condition.

   “(g) The UAB Department and any UAB School of Medicine affiliated pediatric training entity, including any authorized physician, nurse, attendant, or agent thereof, shall not be subject to prosecution for the unlawful possession, use, distribution, or prescription of marijuana under the laws of this state for its activities arising directly out of or directly related to the prescription or use of cannabidiol (CBD) in the treatment of individuals diagnosed with a debilitating epileptic condition.

   “(h) The UAB Department will establish a research and development study purposed to determine medical uses and benefits of cannabidiol (CBD) for individuals with debilitating epileptic conditions.

   “(i) The UAB Department and any UAB School of Medicine affiliated pediatric training entity, including any authorized physician, nurse, attendant or agent thereof, shall not be subject to prosecution for the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of marijuana under the laws of this state for its activities arising directly out of or directly related to the department’s research and development activities in pursuit of medical benefits and uses of cannabidiol (CBD) , as long as the prescription, treatment or use of cannabidiol (CBD) is provided only to individuals diagnosed with a debilitating epileptic condition.

   “(j) Pursuant to the filing requirements of Rule

15.3 of the Alabama Rules of Criminal Procedure, the defendant shall produce a valid prescription, certification of a debilitating epileptic condition, and the name of the prescribing health care professional authorized by the UAB Department.

   “(k) This section is repealed July 1, 2019 July 1, 2020.

   “(l) Nothing in this section shall be construed to allow or accommodate the prescription, testing, medical use, or possession of any other form of Cannabis other than that defined by this section.

Section 3. This act shall not be construed to authorize any individual or caregiver to grow marijuana for his or her medical use, for the medical use of any member of his or her family, or for the medical use of any patient of the caregiver.

Section 4. This act shall become effective immediately following its passage and approval by the Governor, or its otherwise becoming law.

Alabama Seed-to-Sale Traceability Info

COMPLIANCE KEY FEATURES

Compliance is in our minds through all facets of our Seed-to-Sale Cannabis Tracking

  • Custom Compliance-Focused Reporting
  • Track Waste, Destruction and Account for Conversion and Moisture Losses
  • Transport Manifests With All Necessary Information
  • Real-Time Patient and Customer Limit Tracking
  • Real-Time Product Recalls
  • Compliant Labels Customized with Your Business Logo, Name, and Much More

Whether you’re utilizing a locally hosted server or our state-of-the-art cloud hosting service, rest easy knowing that your data security is one of our top priorities. This is why BioTrack was the first publicly traded seed-to-sale software company to complete both a SOC 2 Type I & Type II audit.

Adherence to state and local cannabis regulations in all active markets. Print compliant labels, enforce sales limits, and verify recommendations quickly and accurately. Regular system updates ensure compliance if regulations change.

Take advantage of over 100 advanced reports to make profit-minded decisions based on predictive yields, sales trends, average wait time and more. Need to upload financial reports to an accounting system? Easily export reports, save in the desired format, and upload.

Live Phone, Chat, and Email support from 8am-8pm PST. Supplement initial training with online tutorials, wikis, and monthly best practices features.

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